Pain in Middle America

Discussion in 'Economics & Trade' started by kazenatsu, Jun 28, 2017.

  1. kazenatsu

    kazenatsu Well-Known Member Past Donor

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  2. james M

    james M Banned

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    the pain is cased by liberals who attacked and destroyed love, family, and religion, and, shipped jobs to China with amazingly idiotic policies like the highest corporate tax in the world.
     
  3. kazenatsu

    kazenatsu Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    Yeah, it doesn't make much sense to tax those American manufacturing companies unless you can tax the Chinese companies too, or at least their imports.
     
  4. james M

    james M Banned

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    we could tax their imports but that would merely raise prices for Americans and start a trade war.
     
  5. kazenatsu

    kazenatsu Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    Opioid Epidemic:

    On Monday the White House commission examining the nation's opioid epidemic, headed by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, released its interim report that says President Donald Trump should declare an emergency because "our citizens are dying."

    The recommendation that Trump declare a national public health emergency over the growing opioid crisis is long overdue and a welcome relief, according to medical professionals and those battling the epidemic on the front lines. But some worry the administration may not follow through on campaign promises to address the opioid crisis, and they express concern that the recent evidence-based treatment recommendations are at odds with the Justice Department's new war on drugs.

    Of the White House commission's recommendation, "I was really pleased to see the news. It's overdue," said Dr. Guohua Li, a professor of epidemiology and anesthesiology at Columbia University who has been studying the epidemic for over a decade. "If the president declares the opioid epidemic as a national public health emergency, it means every state health department, local government and the federal government would treat this as the top priority."

    An emergency declaration would provide an influx of logistics, funding and public policy initiatives in communities across the country, which Li says "could have an immediate impact for the better."

    It is not often that a public health emergency is declared for something other than a natural disaster. The US Department of Health and Human Services declared one in Puerto Rico last year after more than 10,000 Zika cases were reported there. Before that, the last emergency declaration, unrelated to a natural disaster, was during the 2009-10 flu season, when there was widespread concern over a potential pandemic.

    But Li noted that the opioid epidemic is much different. "In previous health emergencies, the president declared an emergency based mostly on the potential threat of an infectious epidemic," he said. "But this one is a reality, and it's been getting worse for more than 15 years. The second important difference is that the opioid epidemic is a man-made epidemic -- and maybe for the first time, a man-made epidemic has reached this proportion."​

    http://www.cnn.com/2017/08/04/health/opioid-emergency-declaration-importance/index.html


    This isn't just a drug epidemic, it's an economic epidemic.

    People don't see much hope in these regions of the country, and so they turn to opiates to dull their pain. In many cases these "overdoses" are more like suicides, people who've been out of work for years or stuck in minimum-wage part-time jobs. Ironically even as some of the jobs have come back these people aren't qualified to do it. They've been out of the workforce for so long that their skills have atrophied and they're strung out on drugs. Employers in these regions are complaining they can't find enough workers who can pass a drug test.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2017
  6. james M

    james M Banned

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    1) yes too bad liberal taxes deficits and unions drove their jobs offshore
    2)and too bad the liberal attack on religion family and schools rendered them in many cases unfit for work and without a support system in life
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2017
  7. kazenatsu

    kazenatsu Well-Known Member Past Donor

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